Belize Field Program

Students at the Belize Archaeology Field Program


Costa Rica Field School 2008

Dr. Glenn and students observing monkeys at La Selva, Costa Rica


Mona monkey skull

Mona monkey skull used in teaching and research


Skeletal specimen

Specimen from the skeletal collections at our labs


Spider monkeys

Spider monkeys at La Selva, Costa Rica


Study abroad in Tibet

Study abroad in Tibet


Alisha Gaskins

Former student Alisha Gaskins completing a facial reconstruction


San Nicolas

Melinda Salisbury and Laura Monterrosa measuring pit depth at San Nicolas


Aten Temple-Tell el Amarna

small Aten Temple-Tell el Amarna


West Africa Magnuson monkeys

Former Graduate student Lindsay Magnuson tracking monkeys in West Africa


Anthropology student

Anthropology student


Student Making Peanut Butter in Bolivia

Erin Wheelis making peanut butter, Bolivia Peace Corps


Dai Sun Xian Ceremony

Dai Suan xian ceremony


Anthropology Student dancing in field in
Burma

Anthropology students immersed in the Grenadian culture


Dai Dinner

Dai Dinner


Howling monkeys

Howling monkeys at La Selva, Costa Rica


Costa Rica Field School 2008

Students in San Jose, Costa Rica, at the end of the Costa Rica Primate Field Program


Costa Rica Field School 2008

Students at the Costa Rica Primate Field Program


Belize Field School

Dr. Cortes-Rincon and students at the Belize Archaeology Field Program


Costa Rica Field School 2008

Students observing monkeys at La Selva, Costa Rica


Contact Information

Humboldt Center for
Evolutionary Anthropology
Humboldt State University
1 Harpst Street
Arcata, CA 95521

Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSS) 233
Phone: 707.826.4330

Humboldt Center for Evolutionary Anthropology

mona monkey skull

The HCEA is dedicated to providing quality training and research opportunities in biological anthropology for HSU students. At HCEA, student research assistants learn methods and engage in research in evolutionary and applied anthropology by working both independently (as project leads and in groups) and with faculty and other researchers. Research in the lab is constantly evolving depending on the interests of researchers and students.

Are you a student interested in working in the lab? Some of our student projects are drop-in, but most require you to apply to be a research assistant (for consistency purposes). The goal is that each research assistant participates in a project that they can feel proud of and that is related to their interests. We usually have about 6-10 research assistants each semester, with applications evaluated based on class standing, academic record, goals and date of application. Current assistants that want to remain in the lab will need to fill out an application each semester.

 

mona monkeySome areas of current interest include:

  • Forensic Anthropology
  • Comparative Anatomy
  • Taphonomy and Zooarchaeology
  • Evolutionary Medicine and Nutrition
  • Conservation of Critically Endangered Primates
  • Primate Behavior and Ecology
  • Bioacoustics and Communication
  • Children's Literature