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Frequently asked questions:

What is the Bias Education Intiative?

Are my discussions with representatives from the Bias Education Initiative confidential?

If I discuss a concern with you, in person or in any other form, will your automatically share it with the University Police?

If I am a student, or discuss a concern that involves a student, will you automatically share my concern with the Dean of Students and Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities?

What happens if someone tells you that I committed or was involved in an act of bias?

What happens when everything is done?

Does the Bias Education Initiative want to know about off-campus concerns and experiences related to bias, hate and exclusion?

Is the Bias Education Initiative related to the Bias Response Team?

 

What is the Bias Education Initiative?

The Bias Education Initiative brings together individuals from across campus including staff, faculty, and administrators in multiple offices and fields. Located in the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Bias Education Initiative offers a supportive informal process that university members can use to discuss experiences or concerns about bias and exclusion, so that we can provide support to those who have experienced or witnessed an act of bias. With a focus on creating learning opportunities across campus to address key areas of concern relative to bias and hate, the Bias Education Initiative also leads the development of educational programming in this area, gathers information about bias incidents and hate crimes on our campus, and supports the university in developing best practices in terms of policy, action, and education in relation to bias and hate. 

What will happen  if I discuss an incident with a representative of the Bias Education Initiative?

Are my discussions with representatives from the Bias Education Initiative confidential?

First and foremost, we ALWAYS strive to respect your privacy. At the same time, there are occasionally times when, based on the nature of what you share with us, we are obligated (per CSU Policy – see Executive order 1073, 1074) to discuss it with the appropriate campus official. For instance, if what you tell us indicates that there is a serious threat to the campus or to campus members, we would need to discuss this concern with campus police and/or the Dean of Students. Or, if you were to relate to us an experience of sexual assault, we would need to contact the appropriate office depending on if the victim was a student, faculty or staff, in order for that office to ascertain whether a formal investigation is warranted. However, in all but extreme cases, you always have the choice to decide whether or not to go forward with an investigation from an office on campus (Student Affairs, Human Resources, etc) that may be triggered by such a referral. In our experience, over 90% of concerns discussed with the Bias Education Initiative do not meet the criteria by which we need to disclose to another person on campus. The cases that did need to have someone else brought in involved an ongoing threat to individuals on campus and we had to act to protect those persons. And, even in those cases, we always do everything we can to treat your concern confidentially and respect your privacy.

If I discuss a concern with you, in person or in any other form, will you automatically share it with University Police?

No. Not all concerns are criminal in nature. If we question whether the concern you bring us is criminal or not, or if there are safety issues involved, we may ask the University Police to review it and determine whether further action by University Police is warranted.

If I am a student, or discuss a concern that involves a student, will you automatically share my concern with the Dean of Students and Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities?

No, but that might be an option for you and the Bias Education Initiative to discuss as part of your action plan to resolve the situation. As with all reports, depending on the nature of the concern, we may be obliged to discuss your concern with the appropriate campus office, who may contact you for further discussion. (for more information, see above, Are my discussions with the Bias Education Initiative confidential?)

What happens if someone tells you that I committed or was involved in an act of bias?

As always, our process is one of confidentiality if at all possible, for all of those involved in any situation that is brought to our attention. As described in What happens if I talk with the BEI?, we will work with individuals bringing a concern to us to determine next steps in addressing or resolving the situation or concern. If that involves a discussion with you or others, we will contact you. We will also work with the individual raising the concern to determine whether to pursue a formal complaint through the university’s system (for instance, through Student Rights and Responsibilities, or through the HSU Discrimination Report process), in which case someone may contact you to discuss that process.

What happens when everything is done?

We will keep general and statistical information about concerns brought to us for inclusion in HSU's annual report on campus diversity and inclusion.

Does the Bias Education Initiative want to know about  

off-campus concerns and experiences related to bias, hate and exclusion?

Yes. We are very concerned with supporting our campus members as much as possible in the off-campus community. Additionally, in relation to students, the university’s expectations for student conduct extend beyond the geographic boundaries of campus and include all students, regardless of where they live. HSU can and does hold students accountable for behavior that violates the Student Code of Conduct.

Is the Bias Education Initiative related to the Bias Response Team?

In the Fall of 2011 Humboldt began a program called the Bias Response Team, located in the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. This team, and its process, responded to issues and events  at HSU that fell under the definition of bias and hate incidents and was meant to allow students, staff and faculty a place to report, and work towards resolution about, issues of bias and hate. The Bias Response Team also conducted education about bias/hate and ways to counter and preempt it from occurring  As of Spring 2012, due to new federal and CSU policy (see CSU Executive Order 1074), the Bias Response Team shifted its focus and reorganized itself as the Bias Education Initiative.

What other policies protect individuals?
Please review these resources: