Faculty & Staff

Guy Aronoff Lecturer

M.A., CSU Northridge

During my twenty-five years of teaching at the secondary and collegiate levels I have attempted to provide my students with a foundation in American history and encourage them to find answers to the challenges of today from the myriad perspectives to be found from our nation’s history.

Over the last decade I have been fortunate to have worked with numerous experts in their field at Brown University (Dr. Charles Neu – George Kennan, American Foreign Policy). Stanford University (Dr. David Kennedy – FDR’s America), and the University of Southern California (Dr. John Elliott – Political Economy).

Courses Taught
  • HIST 110. United States History to 1877
  • HIST 111. United States History from 1877
Guy Aronoff

Robert Cliver Associate Professor

Ph.D. Harvard University

I have taught at HSU since the spring of 2007, offering courses in the history of East Asia, China, Japan, and the Soviet Union, as well as a course in world history for future teachers. My courses not only help students to understand the relevant historical content, but also provide students an opportunity to practice their skills as historians – critical reading & thinking skills, research methods, historical writing, and oral debate and presentation.

Courses Taught
  • HIST 107: East Asia to 1644
  • HIST 108: East Asia since 1644
  • HIST 210: Historical Methods
  • HIST 311: World History to 1750
  • HIST 329: Imperial China
  • HIST 338: Modern China
  • HIST 339: Modern Japan
  • HIST 350: History of the Soviet Union
  • HIST 393: Pre-modern Japan
  • HIST 490: Senior Seminar
Robert Cliver
  • Office: FH 153
  • Office Hours: On sabbatical spring 2014; will return fall 2014
  • Phone: 707.826.3247
  • Email: rc61@humboldt.edu

Paul Geck Lecturer

M.A., University of Missouri~Kansas City

I am a history Instructor and a social scientist. I have been hired by different universities and community colleges to teach history and instruct students on how to produce college level academic work. My primary goal in the classroom is to cultivate students that can think critically about history & society and judge for themselves the validity of information and the subjectivity of academic writings. As a social scientist I believe history provides universal and real-life examples to study, analyze, and compare to modern societies. Unlike other scientists, the social sciences cannot test their theories by performing experiments: we must make do with history.

Courses Taught
  • Hist 104: Western Civilization to 1650
  • Hist 105: Western Civilization since 1650
  • Hist 110: United States History to 1877
  • Hist 111: United States History since 1877
Paul Geck
  • Office: FH 151
  • Office Hours: R 3-4:30pm & by appt.
  • Phone: 707.826.4989
  • Email: pjg13@humboldt.edu

Dakota Hamilton Lecturer

Ph.D. Oxford University

As a humanist I firmly believe that a student cannot understand a particular event in time without consulting a broad context. This is why I incorporate so many of the liberal arts in my classes—literature, music, art, philosophy, religion, and even science. I hold the firm belief that only an individual who is well educated in a variety of subjects­­—from the liberal arts to the sciences—is prepared for this modern world of ours. I want my students to take their place in the workforce but I also want them to live life fully. I emphasize critical thinking and writing in all of my classes, skills that further help students navigate and understand the rapid changes they will face throughout their lives.

Courses Taught
  • HIST 312: World History since 1750
  • HIST 322: The Age of Knights and Monks
  • HIST 349: Renaissance and Reformation Europe
  • HIST 354: Modern Britain
  • HIST 352: Tudor/Stuart England, 1485-1714
  • HIST 353: History of England – 19th and 20th centuries
  • HIST 392: Special Topics in European History – Women in Europe
Dakota Hamilton
  • Office: FH 157
  • Office Hours: MW 2-2:30pm & by appt.
  • Phone: 707.826.5765
  • Email: dlh7003@humboldt.edu

Benjamin Marschke Associate Professor & Chair

Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles

I offer courses in modern European history. I am dedicated to creating stimulating and rigorous environments in which my students can learn. I challenge my students to learn as much about the “how” of history as the “what” of history – that is, my courses explore history as a craft and an academic discipline at the same time that they explain history as the story of the past.

Courses Taught
  • History 104: Western Civilization to 1500.
  • History 105: Western Civilization since 1500.
  • History 210: Historical Methods.
  • History 300: The Era of World War I.
  • History 301: The Era of World War II.
  • History 342: Musketeers, Witches, and Kings
  • History 345: The French Revolution and Napoleon.
  • History 348: Modern Germany.
  • History 490: Senior Seminar
  • History 499: Student History Conference

Read more »
Benjamin Marschke
  • Office: FH 155
  • Office Hours: W 12:30-2:30pm, & R 1-3pm
  • Phone: 707.826.3170
  • Email: marschke@humboldt.edu

Thomas D. Mays Professor

Ph.D TCU

I’m an associate professor of the Department of History. I came to HSU in 2003 after spending five years teaching history at Quincy University in Illinois. I grew up in the Midwest and my family’s traditional home in Virginia. I recently retired from the military after serving 25 years on active duty and reserves. I hold a Ph.D. from TCU in Fort Worth, TX, an M.A. from Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, VA and a B.A. from Roanoke College in Salem, VA. Currently I teach early American history, colonial through the Civil War. I am interested in the American Revolutionary and Civil War eras and have three books and several articles in print. I have some film and television experience in working on the series “Washington’s Generals” for the History Channel and in movies including Gettysburg and North and South Book II.

Courses Taught
  • HIST 110: U.S. History to 1877
  • HIST 111: U.S. History from 1877
  • HIST 210: Introduction to History
  • HIST 368: Colonial & Revolutionary America
  • HIST 369: Age of Jefferson and Jackson
  • HIST 371: Civil War and Reconstruction
  • HIST 420: Interpreting Historical Concepts for Teachers
  • HIST 490: Senior Seminar in History
  • HIST 482 Internship in History
Thomas D. Mays

Gayle Olson-Raymer Lecturer

I have been teaching at HSU for 18 years in both the History and Education departments. Currently, I am an adjunct professor in the History Department where I teach History 110, History 111, History 420, and History 383, as well as serve as the Advisor to the History Major, Social Science Education Track.

Courses Taught
Gayle Olson-Raymer

Suzanne Pasztor Associate Professor

Ph.D. University of New Mexico

I began teaching at the university level in 1992 while finishing my doctoral dissertation. After 3 years at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, I moved on to a position at the University of the Pacific, where I taught in both the History Department and the School of International Studies. In 2005, when my husband Tim had the chance to take a job in Eureka, I was fortunate to be able to join the faculty at Humboldt State University. HSU and its students bring back fond memories of my own days as an undergraduate, and I relish the opportunity I’ve been given to develop my teaching in new directions.

Courses Taught
  • HIST 109. Colonial Latin American History
  • HIST 109B. Modern Latin America
  • HIST 210. Historical Methods
  • HIST 312. World History from 1750
  • HIST 326. History of Mexico
  • HIST 327. History of Brazil
  • Central America and Caribbean
  • Women in Latin America
  • Latin America through Film
Suzanne Pasztor
  • Office: FH 147
  • Office Hours: MW 3-5pm & by appt.
  • Phone: 707.826.3643
  • Email: sp49@humboldt.edu

Anne Paulet Professor

Ph.D. Rutgers University

I strongly believe in challenging students to do their best while providing them with a supportive environment in which to strive to excel. I spend a great deal of time carefully constructing my classes to help build students’ historical knowledge and their skills in analytical thinking, critical evaluation, research and written and oral communication.

Courses Taught
  • HIST 111: US History since 1877
  • HIST 210: Historical Methods
  • HIST 372: Rise of Modern America, 1877-1929 (DCG Domestic)
  • HIST 375A: US Foreign Relations to 1943
  • HIST 375B: US Foreign Relations since 1943
  • HIST 377: Vietnam Wars (DCG Non-Domestic)
  • HIST 490: Senior Seminar
Anne Paulet
  • Office: FH 148
  • Office Hours: MW noon-2:50pm & by appt.
  • Phone: 707.826.3118
  • Email: ap23@humboldt.edu

Peggy Stewart Administrative Support Assistant

When I joined the History/Politics/Environment & Community M.A. Program office in August 2009, it furthered a connection with HSU and Founders Hall that began when I came to HSU as a student to study English and geography. After I graduated in 2006, I worked as a copy editor at The Eureka Reporter until the newspaper folded, at which point I returned to HSU as a staff member. I feel very fortunate to be working in a university environment and especially in the History/Politics/Environment & Community office. Personally, I love books, sports (I was a member of the HSU women’s basketball team as a student), and cooking.

Peggy Stewart

Linda Wilson Administrative Support Coordinator

I began in 1992 working part-time in the History Department and now serve as the Coordinator for History and Politics and the Environmental & Community Masters Program. I have served with ten different department chairs and hope I have helped them achieve their respective goals while maintaining consistency and efficiency within the departments. I am proud of my annual efforts in helping to organize and present History Day and working with all of the participants, especially the late Wm. Tanner. My greatest joy and source of pride is my two children. I particularly love to travel including an annual sojourn to the Sundance Film Festival, and I’m excited to have recently studied Italian in anticipation of a possible summer trip to Europe. Working at Humboldt is a unique experience. Every year there is new group of eager yet anxious students to meet. My most and least treasured day of the year is graduation when I watch students I have seen through tribulation and triumph walk down the aisle to claim their diploma.

Photo Coming Soon