BASW Course Descriptions

BASW Course Descriptions

SW 104 - Introduction to Social Work and Social Work Institutions:    This course introduces students to the central values, issues, and methods for facilitating social change conceptualized by social work practices with individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities, and policies. Grounded in a generalist model, social work is studied from the perspective of historical background and contemporary fields of service. Human diversity is emphasized.

SW 255 - Beginning Social Work Experience:   This course offers students a beginning experience volunteering in a social service setting. Acquisition and development of values, skills, and beliefs for building ethical helping relationships consistent with social work in a diverse society are emphasized. The focus of seminar meetings is exploration of one's self in relation to the helping process. Two units: four hours/week (60 hours total) of volunteer work and one hour/week in seminar. Graded Credit/No Credit.

SW 330 - Social Policy:    This course examines the characteristics of social policy, its development, formation, and implementation. Students engage in analysis of major social policies and identify how international, federal, state, local, and tribal legislation influences social work practice and service delivery. Strategies for changing policies with a focus on social, environmental, and economic justice is emphasized. Prerequisites for social work students: Concurrent enrollment in SW 341 and SW 351.

SW 340 - Social Work Methods I:    This first course in the social work methods sequence introduces the student to the application of generalist social work practice. Processes and strategies for relationship building, assuming a collaborative partnership, describing problems, assessing resources, developing plans, and evaluating progress with people are emphasized. A strengths perspective is stressed with a focus on work with individuals and families. There is considerable opportunity for self-reflection in relation to the development of one's practice. Prerequisites for social work students: Concurrent enrollment in SW 350 and SW 382.

SW 340L - Social Work Methods I Lab:    Generalist method: relationship building, forming partnerships, describing problems, assessing resources, developing plans, and evaluating progress. Explore personal processes involved in becoming a helper. Prerequisites for social work students: Concurrent enrollment in SW 340.

SW 341 - Social Work Methods II:    This second course in the social work methods sequence continues to develop the students' application of generalist social work practice. Processes and strategies for relationship building, assuming a collaborative partnership, describing problems, assessing resources, developing plans, and evaluating progress with people continue to be emphasized. A strengths perspective continues to be stressed with a focus on work with groups, organizations, communities, and society. There is considerable opportunity for self-reflection in relation to the development of one's practice. Prerequisites for social work students: Concurrent enrollment in SW 330 and SW 351.

SW 341M - Social Work Methods II Lab:    Expand understanding of generalist method. Emphasis is on work with organizations, communities, policy, and society. Prerequisites for social work students: Concurrent enrollment in SW 341.

SW 350 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment I:    This first course in the human behavior and social environments sequence focuses on the student's beginning professional preparation in generalist social work practice using a contextual and strength-based model for understanding human experiences, with a particular emphasis on individuals, families and small groups. Diversity within human experience and the influences that shape human experience are highlighted. The marginalizing role of dominant power structures is explored. People are understood in relation to multiple systems that generate identity and behavior. The social construction of values, attitudes, beliefs, and behavior through language is described. Traditional theories of individual, family, and group development are covered, as well as more recent theoretical developments. Prerequisites for social work students: Concurrent enrollment in SW 340 and SW 382.

SW 351 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment II:    This second course in the human behavior and social environments sequence focuses on the student's developing professional preparation in generalist social work practice using a contextual and strength-based model for understanding human experiences, with a particular emphasis on large groups, organizations, communities, and society. Diversity within human experience and the influences that shape human experience continue to be highlighted. The marginalizing role of dominant power structures continues to be explored. People are understood in relation to multiple systems that generate identity and behavior. The social construction of values, attitudes, beliefs, and behavior through language is described. Traditional theories of large group, organizational, community, and societal development are covered, as well as more recent theoretical developments. Prerequisites for social work students: Concurrent enrollment in SW 330 and SW 341.

SW 355 - Social Agency Experience:    This course provides an exposure to human service agency settings and processes. The seminar focuses on the organizational context for social work in relation to service delivery, working with colleagues, collaboration with other agencies, and the influence of policy. Two units: four hours/week (60 hours total) of volunteer work and 90 minutes/week in seminar. Graded Credit/No Credit. Prerequisite: Admission to Social Work Program.

SW 356 - Field Preparation:    This field preparation course is designed to prepare students to participate in the selection process for senior year internship, to understand the purpose of the senior year field placement, and to increase the likelihood of a beneficial and meaningful field experience. Prerequisites for social work students: Concurrent enrollment in SW 341, SW 351, SW 330.

SW 382 - Social Work Research:    This course is designed to help students understand and appreciate research as an analytic and interpretive approach to developing a knowledge base for social work practice; for evaluating service delivery to individuals, groups, families, organizations and communities; and for discovering aspects of living that might otherwise go unrecognized. Students develop skills to review professional research articles for their strengths, limitations, and informative value for practice. The course teaches students to evaluate quantitative and qualitative social work research on the basis of clarity of concepts; sampling strategies; internal and external validity of the research design; reliability and validity of measurement instruments; consideration of ethical and human diversity issues; analysis of data; and developing conclusions relevant to social work. Practice and program evaluation methods are covered. Prerequisites for social work students: Concurrent enrollment in SW 340 and SW 350.

SW 455 - Field Experience:    The field experience is designed to provide the opportunity to apply and develop generalist social work practice through a program of guided field experience in a social service agency setting. The student's practice is supervised by an experienced Agency Supervisor. Fifteen hours per week of structured practice in the agency is required. Minimum of 200 hours each semester; total of 400 hours.

SW 456- Field Experience Seminar:    This course is the weekly seminar where students, together with their Faculty Liaison, process experiences in the field in relationship to social work concepts. Designed to integrate theory with practice, to gain information about community resources, to monitor student progress in the agency, and to process the experiences in the field on practical, conceptual, and ethical levels. Emphasis is on engaging students to support one another's personal-professional growth in understanding the use of self.